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Full text of "The first Dixie reader : designed to follow the Dixie primer"

WCWORiAl LIBRARY 
UNIVERSITY OF PfTTSBtfff&j 



UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 








Dar. 

PE111? 

A1M8 



Darlington JVLemorial .Library 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

University of Pittsburgh Library System 



http://www.archive.org/details/firstdixiereaderOOmoor 



y£££&3^£&5— 5Sfc3-^3fc5r»*26fe, 



THE 



FIRST DLXIE READER 

TO SUCCEED THE 

DIXIE PRIMER. 



MES. M. E. HOOEE 



Second Edition 




RALEIGH, N. C, 
BRANSON & FAKRAE, 

FATETTEVILLE STREET. 




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♦ 



trrt Htsu & 



«- -* L . 



DESIGNED TO FOLLOW 



THE 



DIXIE PRIMER. 



BY 



MRS M. B. MOORE. 



RALEIGH: ./ 
BRANSON, FARRAR & CO. 

1863, 



A. M. COMMAS, FRiXTEK. 



PREFACE. 



This little volume is in tended to folijow the 
Dixie Pffafef : stetf to accompany a Spoiler, whicfi 
witi be brought out. as earl^ as circumstances will 
permit, fil no distant period we hop? to edm- 
j iete the scries of Readers. 

The ant bar hop^s the book will recommend it - 
f«-U to fiuac&tarsrn the-Southern Goofs ! -:.\:>-. 



NOTE TO TEACHERS. 



This little work is intended as a stepping-stone 
from the Primer to the large Speller. . The first 
principles of spelling and reading, are here eon- 
tinned, before the child is far enough advanced 
to understand properly the sounds of letters, and 
the rules of pronunciation. Children frequently 
destroy a spelling book or two before they are 
ready for ^uch a book. 



FIRST DIXIE READER. 







LESSON I. 






Cat 


bet 


bit 


cot 


cut 


- bat 


get . 


dit 


dot 


gut 


fat 


fet • 


fit 


got 


mufc 


mat 


met 


lit 


lot 


put 


pat 


pet 


pit 


pot 


nut 


rat 


set 


sit 


sot 


sut 



A NEW BOOK, 

1. See ! here is a new book ! Can you 
read it ? 

2. I cannot read well ; but I can spell. 

3. If you lore to spell you will soon read. 

4. Be sure you spell each woy 1 1 1 

Some boys an<l ' ' ... 
a Bays he will, 
spell well " 



10 





NIMT DIZIB RBADBK. 








LESSON IV. 




Ball 


bell 


bill doll 


dall 


call 


dell 


gill eoll 


cull 


fall 


fell 


fill joll 


gull 


gall 


bell 


hill moll 


hull 


ball 


sell 


pill poll 


muB 


ptlf 


tell 


mill . voll 


null 



THE SUN. 

1. God made the sun to give us light and 
beat. 

2. It is far from us, and this makes it look 
ao small. 

3. It is quite large, and so hot we could 
not live near it. 

4. The earth moves round the sun once in 
a year. » 

5. The heat of the sun makes the grass 
and corn and fruits grow. 

6. God is good to make us such a sun to 
give us light and heat. We should love hiiB 
for bis care. 



rmsT d:xie header. 11 





LE 


5S0N V, 




Art 


end 


l>onc 


dine 


dart 


l.fnd 


coce 


fine 


Lart 


' Jejid 


bone 


mine 


mart 


tnend 


lone 


piae 


atrt 


send 


pone 


tirio 


tart 


tend 


tone 


vine 



THE NEW HAT. 

1. Mark has a new hat. It is a strawJmt. 

2. Who made it? 

3. Jane made it of wheat straw. 

4. It is a nice hat. I wish she would 
make me one like it, 

5. She will make you one, if you ask her 
to do so. She plaits well. 

6. She is a good girl to make. us hats. She 
Call spin too. She has spun me- a row coat. 

7. I love to see girls work. Jane will 
grow up to be good and all will love her, 



•HH-crvan aixia ishi.s 



22 FIRST DIXIE RKADEK. 





LESSON VI. 




Ask 

bask 

cask 


best 
jest 
lest 


i?k 

dirk 
kirk 


bunk 
huok 
junk 


mask 
task 


pest 
test 


mirk 
quirk 


punk 
aunk 




THE 


FROG. 





1. The frog hops. He cannot run like, 
jou can. He sleeps in the day and hops i 

night. 

2. Soxe boys fcilj frogs ; but this is bad. 
They do us no harm and we must let them 
hop at night. 

3. The frog lives on worms and flies. H< 
pokes his- tongue out, and the flies stick to it 

4. God made his tongue with glue on it, a 
he could thus get his food. God is good 
even to the frogs. 





LESSON 

• 


VII. 




Bsfa 


bile 




bole 


use 


cale 


file 




doJe 


oaee 


dale 


mile 




cole 


fuse 


gale 


pile 




hole 


muse 


pale 


tile 




m ;le 


:,u?e 


bale 


wile 




pole 


tUM 




THE 


OWL. 





1. The owl has a large head. He has 
large eyes too, so he can see in the dark. 

2. He sleeps all day in a- tall tree, and at 
night he flics out to get a hen, or a duck, or 
a goose. 

3. He is bad to get our liens. If pa can 
sec him- he will kill him with his gun. 

4. It is not bad to kill the owl for he does 
UB harm. His wing will make a good fan. 

5. The owl cries u who, wto, who," at night. 





LESSON 


VIII. 




And 


end 




bind 


old 


band 


bend ' 




fiiid 


col J" 


land 


!e:,d 




Lkd 


foL) 


pjaucl 


raet>d 




kind 


. g°' d 


rasd 


seed 




Djind 


mold . 


sand 


lend 




wiud 


sold 




THE 


COLT; 





1.- James Lad a small colt. His pa gave 
it to him, and he was fond of it. 

2. Bat it was wild and Lis ma i^-la him he 
mm t not go near it. lest it might kick him. 

o. Eat 'one dtiy. James got a rope. and put 
round the colt's neck, and ihtm got on his 
hack to ride. 

4. The colt did not i&e t#,/so he tkn of 
at full speed, and James fell off and got kwf, 

5. Then he thought he would mind bis ma 
n 'Xt time. 



uATf 1/lAIfl KEADER, 15 





LESSON IX 




Back 


beck 


dick 


dock 


back 


deck 


chick 


hook 


jack 


check 


kick 


look 


lack 


peck 


lick 


mock 


nack 


reck 


pick 


pock 


pock 


wreck 


sick 


soek 



THE MOON, 

1. Do you see the bright full moon ? Last 
week it was' a half moon, and now it is fall. 

2. The moon has a dark side and a light 
side, and when she turns all of her bright 
side to us, we have a full moon. 

3. When her dark side is to us we call it 
mew moon. 

4. She has no light of her own. Wbea 
*he sun shines on one side it makes it light, 
and as the moon keeps moving, she turns 
some-times one side, and then the other. 



16 





?IRST DIXIE 


MADElC. 






LESSON X. 




Bar k 




berk 


cork 


dock 


dark 


derk 


dork 


buck 


hark 


jerk 


fork 


luek 


lark 


merk 


pork 


muck 


mark 


perk 


work 


puck 


park 


yerk 


york 


tuck 




THE 


PIG. 





1, See bow the pig eats ! He does not 
know when to stop. 

2. He eats and eats till he looks as if hi s 
sides must burst. But still he eats. 

3, Now some boys and girls are much lik« 
this pig. They do not know when to stop 
till they get sick. 

4. If I were a boy or a girl, I would not 
eat like a pig. I would eat like a lamb, and 
then skip and play, and be so happy. 



FIRST DIISE VEAD-R. 





LESSON 


XL 




Barn 


born 


bora 


burn 


darn 


rem 


corn 


fu?u 


earn 


f.rn 


born 


chum 


tarn 


k«rn 


morn 


burn 


v^rn 


tern 


torn 


ppurn 


yarn 


vern 


worn 


tU2 .'8 



THE QR07?. 

1. This is a large black bird. It suts caw, 
caw, when, it iKe~. 

% It wears ft nice black dress, but it is q 
h -d h:r<l. 

o. Aviicn it sees the men plant coi n, n goes 
m.u hunts in the row, and gets the grains. 

4. -The men Rotiie* tjir.es make LoUs in a 
i '-. W g ; a;ns of corn, and tic long tiovae Lairs 
■-M il.u:;. -TLoe are gm in ih: ivwp, 

*«. W;.',; the Ci(»5 eats tl.e^c the i.air t'till - 
stajs in :,- .ItiQ^tj i. nu ia iLe c^uie o' I.l? 

death- 

2 



18 



FIRST DIXIE RE A BE"*, 





LESSON XII. 




Arm 


• end 


dine 


cak* 


alarm 


bend 


fine 


hake 


farm 


fend 


kine 


jake 


barm 


lend 


line 


pake 


m arm 


pend 


iiiirte 


wake 


warm 


vend 


pine 


yake 



TIME TO GET UP. 



1. Come Grace, it is time to get up. Night 
is the time to sleep. "When day comes you 
must rise and wash yOur face. 

2. God made the day for us to work, ai.d 
do good. If we do not im-prove it, He will 
not love us. • 

8. The birds are all up. One sings a song.^ 
one brings a stick for her nest, and. one goes 
to get a worm to eat. 

4. First pray, then washj then brush your 
hair. Now for a kiss ! 





yiRST DIXIB 


READER. 






LESSON 


XIII. 




Deep 


deed 


beer 


beet 


keep 


feed 


deer 


feet 


peep 


heed 


cheer 


- meM 


sleep 


meed 


jeer 


g "■ ■(> 


Fteep 


speed 


leer 


street 


weep 


seed 


peer 


weet 




THE EAR. 





IP 



1. Do you know why we have two ears ? 
It is that we may hear more, and speak less. 

2. If we hear a bad thing we must not tell 
it a-gain. 

3. Some bad boys hear bad words, and 
learn to say them. 

4. Girls too, hear things that are not nice, 
but they must not say them a-gain. 

5. God does not love boys and girls who 
say bad words. Christ did not say a word 
that was bad or ug-ly, in all his lite* 



20 FIB1T DIXtl F.I AD I «. 





. LISSON 


XIT 






An 


•H 


ill 




doll 


dull 


ball 


belP 


bill 




coll 


cull 


call 


cell 


m 




holl 


gull 


hall 


fell 


hiii 




goll 


hull 


fall 


hell 


mill 




loll 


lull 


pall 


mell 


pill 




moll 


niutt 






THE CALF. 


• 





1. You all know what a calf is. All it 
cares far is to go with the;cow, and get her 
milk, 

2. You cajn-not learn a calf to spell. When 
a boy will not learn to spell and read ; and 
cares only for good things to eat, and fine 
clothes to wear, we call him a calf. 

3. Such boys will not make wise men. No 
one cares to have a calf pay him a vis-it. 

4. God has giv-en boys minds to learn ; 
and He ex-peets them to do it. 



¥TT?8T XlIXIl RBADEE. 



si 





LESSON XV, 




Loud 


bound 


burn 


proud 


feui>d 


churn 


shroud 


bound 


. Bpurn 


-oudcc 


mound 


turn 


bounce 


pound 


fum« 


trounoe 


round 


plume 


• 


OUR* BABE. 


% 



1. We have a new babe at our house. It 
is a sweet babe. We call him Tom-my. 

2.. Bob is his nurse. Bob loves Tom-my. 
He says he may ride in his wag-on. 

3. Tom-my will soon learn to love Bob, 
and then what fun they will have ! 
• 4. God gave Tom-my to us. How glad I 
am to have such a sweet broth-er ! He will 
soon be old e-nough to play with me. 



%% yiBST dixis reader. 





LESSON 


XVI. 




Chair 


bain 


beau 


ear 


fair 


dain * 


dean 


imp 


hair 


fa iu 


lean 


fear 


lair 


main 


mean 


Lear 


pair 


pain 


pean 


near- 


slab 


vain 


wean 


tear 



* OLD AUNT ANN. 

1. Here comes old aunt Ann. She is 
quite old. Bee how she leans on her srick* 
* 2. When she was young she did good work, 
but now she can not work mueh. But she is 
not like a poor white wo-man. 

3. Aunt Ann knows that her young Mis» y 
as she calls her, will take care of her as long 
as she lives. - - 

4. Ma-ny poor white folks would be glad io 
live in her house and eat what Miss Kate 
sends out for her din-ner. 



FIRST DIXIB READER. 





LESSON XVII. 

■ 




Bang 


ding dong 


bung 


dang 


eliag gong 


dang 


feDg 


fiing long 


bung 


bang 


ring prong 


lung 


pang 


sing song 


rung 


•rang . 


wing wrong 


SUIig 



HOW IT RAINS! 

1'. Ma, where do the rain drop3 come from? 

2. They drop from the clouds, my child; 

3. But how do they get up there ? 

4. Do you know what fog is ? 

5. It is fine drops of rain. 

6. When wa-ter is in such fine drops, it is 
light and'ri-ses up. When they get high up, 
where the air is. cool, they -come to-geth-er, 
and make large drops. These are heav-y, 
and fall down a-gain. 



24 n*v>T Dim? v.eade*. 



LFSSOX XVH r. 



JW« 


cer* 


ire 


ore 


» <e 


l»Vrfl 


«5 !C 


b»J 


fare 


fere 


ufd 


c. re 


K«r«, 


more 


fire 


for* 


p.** 


vere 


m«re 


bq«»:1 


l- re 


were 


pi e 


do re 



■ TB-fiyNE.W CAP. 

1. John has a new cap. His ma made.lt 
for biro. 

*2. It is a nice cap, and I hope he will take 
pood care of it. 

8. Some b«>ys have no ma to make them 
cap?. Hew glad John should be ! 

4. Poor Jim Jones baa no ma. and It;.-] . 
clothes are in rags, 

5, Ills ma died when he was a babe, and 
the old cook does . not know how to fix up 
boys. Poor J:m'Jj;:c3 ! 



TIUST D.'XII BXADKR. 25 

LESSON XIX. 



D»w 


dew 


bow 


dog 


oaw 


Em* 


e w 


eat 


haw 


Uw " 


low 


fox 


i*w 


mew. 


mow 


naif 


p^w 


p^W 


plow 


C >h 


Faw 


sew 


vo?? 


.<foU 



DO NOT DRINK A DRANf. 

"J. Do you see old Mr, Smith ? How sad 
he looks ! His hat is torn and his clothes 
in rigs. 

. 2. When he was a boy his 1 pa gave him 
drams to drink, and he soon got to love it. 

3. When he came to be a man, he was a 
sot, 'and got drank, and boat his nice wife. 

4. Poor ' wo-man ! she soon got sick and 
died, and left two small babes. 

5. Kow the poor old man and his boys stay 
there, and drink and fight. Is it not s*.d ? 



26 FiXST DIXII RX'ADER. 





LESSON 


XX. 




B: ; ^ 


bess 


boss 


buss 


Cfc* 


•CM 


e ; ;os& 


fess 


glsttl 


\mi 


gloss 


guss 


fo&ss 


mess 


loss 


mnss 


p*§*' 


guess 


n-oss 


russ 


r&53 


tress 


row 


truss 




THE STARS. 





1. JIow 1 love to look at the stars! Who 
can count them ? • 

2. God can count them, for he made them 
all. They are a great way off. 

3. Wise men kok through a large glass, 
*nd tell us that these small stars are as large 
as our sun. 

4. How great God is ! He holds them all 
by his might, and makes them run their 
rounds. And yet this great God counts all 
csjr halts. 



FIR«T DIIIS RSADKX. 



27 





LESSON 


XXL 




Free 


boo 


bush 


eye 


tree 


coo 


CQ3h 


bje 


spree 


loo 


posh 


i,. 


flee 


BOO 


rush 


rye 


gl«» 


too 


brush 


*ye 




KA-TY DID. 





1. How the Ka-ty Did does sing ! How 
large is she ? 

2. She is large as a ver-y small bird. Do 
you know how she sings ? 

8. No ; please tell me, ma-ma. 

4. She has a small saw on each wing, and 
rubs them to-geth-er. 

5. How strange ! Can I see her sing ? 

6. No, she sings at night. 

7. She is quite pret-ty and wears a green 
dress. 



28 FIRST DIXI1 HEADim.' 





LESSON XXII. 




Com pel 


dis-til 


j*-F an 


dispel 


ex-til 


tre pan 


ex pel 


un-til 


tro jan 


re- pel 


ful-fil 


rattan' 


pro p»l 


un-fill 


di van 


co-pel . 


re-fill 


oo-raan 



A CROSS GIRL. 

1. Mat-ty was a cross girl. No one could 
please her. 

2. She would corn-plain at her mam-ma, 
and pa-pa, and her nurse. 

8. Her ma's friends did not like tp go to 
her house, for Matty was so cross she made 
tliem feel badly; 

4. TV hen she grew up her face was wr} r , 
and her eyes red. The young men did not 
{.cn.iic her, for they said she would make a 
cross wife. 



FIB1T Dili B BZjL&BK. 29 

LESSON XXIII. 



Bri-ar 


sa-go 


ci-der 


fri-ar 


bu-bo 


ri-der 


K-ar 


ty -ro 


sni-der 


pry-or 


ha-lo 


ud-^er 


may-or 


ce-gro 


rnd-der 


pray-er 


un-to 


shud-der 



SPRING. 

1. Sweet Spring lias come again ! See 
how the snow melts and runs a- way. 

2. The sun is now high-er u£, and shines 
near-er straight down. This makes the 
around warm. 

3. As the sun gets high-cr the weather 
gets warin-er. 

4. It is so nice. to eeie the prel-iy flow-ers 
of Spring! Do 3*0*1 not hear the bird's 
sing ? Sec hew lu-sy thej are ma-king their 
n>sts. 



30 FIMT DIXIE JtBADES. 





LESSON XXIV. 




Dap per 


sel-ler. 


bet-tor 


clap-p$r 


wel-ler 


let-ier 


[.flap-p^r 


shel-ler 


fet-ter 


lap-per 


spel-ler 


get-ter 


tap per 


tel-ler 


set-ttr 



ssp-per dwel-ler tet-ter 

THE GOOD GIRL. 

1. A-da is a good girl. She loves her pa- 
pa, and mam-ma, and does what they bid her. 

%. She is just four years old, but she can 
be-have well. She loves her book. 

3. Tne la-dies love to have her vis-it them, 
for she gives them so lit- tie trouble. 

4. When three years old, she wouM go to 
her mam-ma, and say, " 'Ell me, mam-ma;" 
then she would put her head down in her lap, 
and say her lit-tle pray-ers. 



FIRST DIXIE READER. 31 

5. Af-ter this she would kiss all, and get 
in her lit-tle bed, and go to sleep. 

6. A-da's pa-pa and mam-ma are glad to 
see their lit-tle girl learn-ing to, be ;ood. 
They hope she will grow up to be a good 
woman. 

7. God loves good lit-tle girls, B i% he 
is angry with the wick-ed ev-e-Tj dag . 

8. All good people iovejgood girls, too ; 
but no one loves bad chil-dren. 

9. Then good gitjs are hap-py ; * t. had 
ones are not. If I wero a lit-tle girl I 
would be the ve-ry best one I knew h&ff to 
be. 



32 FIRST DIXIE RSADSR. 





LESSON 


XXVI. 




Bain 


bean 


loan 


dume 


(lain 


dean 


moan 


fume 


fain 


jean 


groan 


gume 


gain 


lean 


roan 


lumc 


tain 


mean 


moon 


huroe 


pain 


wean 


spoon 


tume 




THE ! 


SHEEP. 


- 



i. The sheep is fine for food and for wool. 
Of the wool Yve injiko hats, socks, coats, &.c. 

2. The be' t broad- cloth is made of the 
•sheep's coat. Ep'Jfe fops when-dress ed up, 
forget that they ewe their best suit toa poor 

'3. 3-he fifF.li of the sheep is calbed limb, 
or-mut tufi. This is very £ue for the tulle. 

4. Boy? -aid girli love to look at the vouiig 
Iambs, unil see them skip slid play. 



yiSST DIXIE READER. 38 

5. I must tell you of an old sheep and hvr 
two lambs. 

6. An old ewe had a black and a white 
lamb. Strange to tell, she loved the black 
one the best, though she was white her-self. 

7. So she drove the white one a-way, and 
would not nurse it.* Then lit-tle Ma-ry beg- 
ged it of her pa-pa, and took it in the yard 
and fed ifc. 

8. She called it Kate, and when Kate saw 
her with her gourd of milk, she would run 
to meet her and bleat till she got the milk. 

0. So you see Ma-ry was bet-ter to the 
lamb than its moth-er was. A few boys and 
girls, have bad moth-ers, like the ewe. 
How glad you should be if you have a good 
moth-er ! 



It FIRST D1SJE READER. 



LESSON XXVlIf. 



Ca-ble 


fid- die 


cod-dig 


fa-bla 


mid- die 


toddle 


ga-ble 


pid-dle 


' Bcat-t'fe 


ja-ble 


gfg-gle 


tut- tie 


gta-ble 


pig-^le 


tur tie 


"ta-ble 


wrig-g^e 
OLD BALL; 


mjr-tle 



1. Old Ball' was a large, no ble horse, ami 
was so do-eile, that Ma mas-ter and all his- 
fam-ily was very fond of him. 

2. Ho would car-ry the chil-dren on 
his back, or draw the btrg-gy, or pull the 
wag-o& 

& He waa so large that when the chil 1 - 



FIRST DIXIE READER. 85 

dren rode him, they look-ed like frogs, and 
they of-ten kept as much noise. 

4. At last one day while Old Ball was 
kelp-ing Jim to draw his har-row, Jim got 
cor>rtra-ry ; and the youth who held the 
Tine cculd not make him turn a-round a£ the 
end of the row, 

5. So while they were step-ping a-bout, the 
har-row turned o-ver, and Ball fell down on 
the teeth. 

6. In three days he died of his wound. 
When the chil-drcn saw Old Ball dead, 
they cried as if their hearts would break. 

7. I have seen some boys who put me in 
iaind of Old Ball and Jim. A head-strong 
boy" will push a good one ia-to danger, while 
ho may e -scape un-hurt. 



26 FiMT DIXIB RIAMK. 

8. But a good boy will al- ways stop the 
rao-ment he is told ; and thus save himself 
and friends much trouble. 





LESSON XXIX. 




A-basa 


d is- claim 


com- m and 


de-base 


pro- claim 


demand 


ia-ease 


re-claim 


remand 


mis-place 


de- claim 


fore -hand 


e-rase 


ex- claim 


by-hand 


em-brace 


en-chain 


oflfmand 




GOD SEES US. 





L The eye of God is up-on us all the day 
long. If you think a bad thought he knows 
it. If you do a bad thing he sees jou. You 
can-not de-ceive him. 



fIl»T D1X1B MADE". 37 

2. Some boys and "girls seem to think 
if no pcr-son sees them do a bad thing, they 
are safe. 

8. But God knows all, and will judge us 
for all we do. How sad ma-ny will be, to 
baye their deeds all made known in the last 
day. 

4. The" Bi-ble tells us that such per-sons 
will call up on the rocks, and hills to hide 
them. that will be an awful time to the 
wick-ed ! 

5. But good people do not |fear to meet 
God in judg-ment. They livj so they fee! 
He is their friend ; and thev dread net to 
meet him. 

6. Dear children, if you wish to be hap- 
py in this life and have no fear of death: 

m 

you must be srood. 

v O 



HS FIRST DIXIE READER. 

7. The way to be good i3 to nev-er do a 
thing which you would not like for your 
pa-rents to know. 

8. When I see chil-dren "hid-ing things 
from their pa-pa and mam-ma, I feel ver-y 
sad; for I know they are in the road to 
ruin. Don't do it, chil-dren I 





LESSON XXX. 




Ban qnet 


bra-ver 


quiv er 


gus set 


era ver 


riv-er 


rus 1 set 


do- ver 


shiver 


pos 8 et 


tro-vor 


sil ver 


vel-vet 


clo-ver 


uc-der 


pal-let 


ro ve r . 


blan der 



UNCLE NED. 

1. Un>cle Ned was a good old dar-key 
and loved his mas-ter well. 

2. They lir-ed near the Yan-kee lines, 
and when the Yan-kee ar-my come, old Ned 



FIEST DIXIE KB A DEO. *9 

and his wife and children, went a* way with 
them. 

3. They 'told Ned that he should be free, 
and live like white folks ; but he soon found 
they had no£ told him the truth. He did 
not fare so well as he did at home wtth fats 
mascter. 

4. So one dark night he slipped away. 
And kept goring till he got back to his kind 
masvter. 

o. The mas ter did not know what to 
think of seeding old Ned alone, so he said 
"Ned, how come you to leave Nan*ny and 
the chil-dren?" 

0. Ned re -plied, Ah, mas^sa, dem Y-in-kee 
no be good to poor nig-ger, can't stay wid 
am. Ned lib wid you all his life." 

7. Then Ned and his master were both 



40 FIRST DIXIE READER. 

glad; he went to work; but he pray-ed ev* 
ery day for God* to send Nan-ny and the 
ba-bies back, I hope they have come back 
ere this. 

8. Ned says "he wants eb -ry nig-ger to 
stay at home and mind his work, and let 
dem Yan-kees do der own work." 



LESSON XXX. 

Prim~mer ev-es ehar-aeF 

gim-mer eleV-er dar-aoel 

trim-mar De?--er chis-el 

glim-mer rrv--er Lov-et 

swioi-rser tqeiv-er cov-el 

* stena-mer cov-er mar-vel: 
THE LUNGS. 

1. This is the part of our Lod-y which 
con-tains the air we breathe, 

2, They con-sist of two parts or lobes. 



* FIRST DIXIB READER* 41 

When we draw breath, or in-hale, these fill 
up with air, and cause the chest to swell out, 

3. They have two sets of cells, one for* 
bleod, and one for the air. These lie 
close to each oth-er, and when the blood, 
and air come near to-gether ; the blood 
turns a bright red col-or,'and be- conies pure. 

4. Then as it pass«e3 all round through 
the bod-y it be-comes dark again. Thus, 
when the lungs get sick the whole bod-y be- 
comes lean, and sick. 

5. Now you see how_iin-por-tant it is for 
us to take care of our. lungs. No one can 
have good health, when this part is weak. 

6. Ev-e>ry child should learn to sit up 
straight, to walk e-rect. and to nev-er let 
the shoul-ders stoop. 

7. Thou-sands have died from it. When 
the lungs can not take in e-nough, the blood 



42 FIRST DIXIE READER- 

b2-comes bad, the face grow$ pale, and beau^ 
t$r is gone. be^ware, girls ! 

8. A^gain, ehiKdren should nev^er sit 
with damp feet. Thi3 of-ten brings on dis- 
ease. While walking it will not hurt niuoh ; 
but when you sit down you must take off 
your shoes and dry them. 



£ 




' LESSON XXXI. 




A -way be- tit 


ad-mit 


b<Hray re -fit 


re-mit 


al-way un-fit 


. per-mit 


es-say com-fit 


tracs-mit 


un-say out-fit 


com-mit 


be-wr&y Fand-pit 


sub -mit 



THE CHATTER BOX. 
1. Do you know Fan-nie Finch ? She is 
nested* for be-ing a great talk^er. No mat- 
er who talks, Fanrnie's tongue still runs. 



FIRST DIXIE KSADBR. . 43 

2. If she comes with her mam*iua to vis«it 
you, she talks on un-til ber mam-ma sends 
her out to play. But still she chat-ters on, 
and you find no time to speak at all. 

3i Now it. would not be quite so bud if 
Faiwiie^was a wise lit-tle girl. She loves 
to talk too well, she does not take time to 
read her book. 

4. So -she knows nothing to talk about, 
save her dolls, her can^dy, her fine dress-es, 
her pret-ty curls, &c. 

5, Peo-ple soon be ccune tired of hearting 
such prat-fele, and wish Fan me would go 
home. They say she is a vain lit-tle girl, 
and ver-y siMy. 

G. They alwso think a\e is not po-lite, be- 
tfausg she does not be qui>et, while her mam- 
ma and the oth-er laddies talk. Lit^tl© 
folks should be seen and not heard, 



44 FIRST DIXIE READER. 

7. I hope none of you will act like Fan. 
nie. While young isjhe time to learn ; and 
think when you are ol^der, you will have 
some- thing to talk a.-bout. 



LESSON XXXII. 



Bor&row 


minn-ow 


taUlow 


morTow 


win. now 


• walslow . 


sorrow 


w!d«ow 


bar*row 


el-bow ^ 


meadow 


faisrow 


felo low 


fallow 


mar->row 


meUow 


mallow 


gpaisrow 



LEARNING TO SPIN. 



1. Well Ma ry ! you wish to learn to 
spin, now I am read y. Hand me the cards, 
and put the band up on the wheel. 



* FIRST DIXIE READER. 45 

2. Here are some rolls, now try to spin 
one. Turn stead y, and draw slow ly, now 
twist, and run it up on the spin die. 

3. But the wheel turns hard ly. It wants 
til. Now soe how much bet ter it runs. A 
wheel with out oil, is like a child with out 
good na ture. m 

4. So when you see chil dren harsh, and 
un pleasant, you will re member how bad ly 
the wheol did, un til you put the oil up on 
it ; and then you will try to get all to use 
the oil of good na ture. 

5: ISTow my child, you have done well. — 
You may try a gain to mor row. I love to 
have you learn how to spin. 

6. As soon as you are old e nough you 
sfojl learn how to weave. Then you caa 



46 FIRST DIXIE READER 

weave your self nice dress es,and your pa pa 
a suit of clothes. How proud he will be to 
wear a suit which your lit tie hands have- 
spun and wove. 

T. I love to see girls use ful, and then 
spin ning, and weav ing are so health y. — 
You seldom hear of a girl dying of eon- 
gurap tion, who has been used to such work 
Then it does not pre vent girls from pass ing 
through the world. 





LESSON XXXIV. 

1 




Caress . 


admass 


morass 


depress 


re-pass 


cui-rass 


c~gress 


un-pass 


er^gress 


in* gross 


sur^pafs 


a»nuss 


pro grees 


co n:-pass 


re»ttiss 


duress 


invpass 


ad-miee 



FIRST DIXIE READER. 4? 

THE FACE. 

1. The face is thcin»dex to the heart of 
man. As p you look on the face of a clock, 
and tell the time of day ; so you may look 
on the hu-man face and read the heart. 

2. If you no-tice the faces of small babies 
they look nearly a -like. Some eyes are 
black, some blue, and some ha-zel ; white 
the noises of some are larg-er than oth -ers. 

8. But when chil-dren be-gin to grow, ami 
s-ome to hava bad tem-pers, you per-ceiv* a 
great dif-fer-ence. * 

4. The* child who. has a bad tem-pei., and 
cries, and pouts, and quarrels, is al-most 
sure to hare red eyes, thick ug-ly lips and 
ofcten a red nose. 

5. Oth er chil-dren are too proad to cry, 
and sulk ; but they smile a bitter smile, 
a-&4 ut-ter a few bi -ting words ; while, t&eir 
ey& look like those of an an-gry snake. 



48 



FIRST DIXIE READER. 



6. These tem-pers, too, tell upon the face. 
The lips will fit tight to-gether, while you 
can al-most see the sparks of mal-iee dart 

from un-der the eye-lids. Such fa-ces are 

. not call-ed hand-some — people fear them. 

7. So you see the way to have a pret-ty 
face, is to feel pretty, and a! -ways try to 
do right* An hon^eat face, is the prettiest 
face yet. All can have this. 



« 


• 








LESSON XXXV. 

• 


• 


» 

House 




loud 


bout 


louse 




cloud 


lout 


grouse 




croud 


flout 


mouse 




proud 


spout 


souse 




shroud 


trout 


trouse 




crowd 


rout 






THE CANE MILL. 

1. Do you see th'e cane mill ? It Is made , 
of i ron. It looks ver y strong. 

2. Kow Mr. Hicks is go ing to make sy- 

« 
rup. See 'him poise the long canes be tween 

the roll era ; and see how the rich juice runs 
down ! 

3. This is put m the large ket ties on the 
furn ace, and boil ed until it is St for use. — 
The scum is fed to the hogs,- and makes them 
grow fast. See ! it takes, one hand all the 
time to skim it well. 

4. The sy rup is good food for girls and 
boys. It is cheap er than ba con, or but ter 
and is much more whole some- Then most 
chil dren are very fond of it. 

-5. Chii dren who liye most ly on sy rup, 



50 FIRST DIXIE READER. 

are not so sub ject to croup ; and it is said 
that per sons us ing much of it are not apt 
to have fe vers, 

6. Then three cheers' for the. cane mill ! 
It is a fine time for hoys and girls, and the 
g#r vants too enjoy.it finely. 

7. See them with their pots boil ing over 
the last skim ming. Some of them will have 
four or five gal ^ons by the time the sea son 
closes. Well done for the dar kies. Ma ny 
poor white" peo pie would he glad of what 
they leave for the hogs. 



A com 
a down 
green hora 
for sworn 
ink horn 
in form 



.LESSON XXXVI. - 

re form " re tun* 

per form 
trans form 

mis form 

de form 

con form 



aun burn 
con cern 
dis cern 
cis tern 
Ian tern 



FIBST DlAia RE^DIR. 51 

• THE SABBATH. 

1. This is God's day ; in it, lie has said, 
" Ye shall do no work, nor think your ]own . 
thoughts." 

2. Now if -it is wrong to work, and e yen 

to think of com mon things, on the Sab bath ; 
it is v rong to plays 

3. Bat some chil dreu think it is a ga la 
day, when Sunday comes ; so they get on 
their clean clothes, and run off for fun. 

4. All day long they play and whoop ; and 
nev ei once think of what God 'has said. 

5. 3 f their fath er had sev en fine mel ons, 
and were to give them six,' and sav-e one for 
him si tf j do you think they would touch it ? 
I think not. 

N 

6. V Vll God has giv en us six days, and 
kept o e for himself. In the sis,, days we 



52 



FIRST DIXIE * HEADER. 



may do what we choose, if we do do, not 
break. God's com mands. 

7. But sad to say,some children, and grown 
people too, are so wick ed, as to take God's 
day a way from him. But I do not think 
they take time to think how bad it is. 

8. I hope, dear readers, you will re mem- 
ber to keep the Sab bath ho ly. At tend 
church if you can ; and if you have no Church 
nor Sunday school to go to, read your Bible 
and pray God to make you hap py. 



LESSON XXXYIL 



Co coon 


roush room 


boon 


drs goon 


bride groom 


• coon 


la goon 


tran soon 


moon 


rac coon 


ft gloom 


loom 


moa soon 


heir loom 


soon 



FIRST BIXIS READ JR. 53 

LULA'S PRAYER. 

1. Lu la wa3 a good lit tic girl, and loved her 
pa pa and mam ma dear ly. 

2. She of tea thought hor pa rents might die, 
and this made her ver y sad. But she soon Earn- 
ed to pray, and she thought God would not be 
an gry, if she ask ed Him to let her pa rents live 
to raise all their chil dren. 

3. So Lu ia grew up still pray iug that G..d 
would grant her de sire. 

4. At length Lu la's moth er was ta ken sick, 
and ma ny thought she would, die. But Lu la 
pursed her du ring her ill ness, and ney er gue 
her up. 

5. She was quite ill for ma ny weeks, but still 
Lu la pray'ed on, and toil ed on. At length s&e 
be g ' prove, and to Lu la's g j ' she 
got well. Lu la was now in her teens, and t^^fc 
all the caics of the fa^a i Ij on -her self. 



54 FIRST DIXIE KSADER'. 

6. Thus ahe had nia ny du tier, but she Aid not 
for get to go a vray aIore,.a bcut sun pet eve ry 
eve ning, and thank God 'for bis mer cy. 

7. I sm hap py to tell you, tlaf Lu la's pa rents 
lived to raise all their chil dree, and see them 
good andfese fol. 



[LESSON XXXVIIT. 

Ap per tain - . do coin peer 

en tor tain re ecru p'ose 

as cer tain in ter pose 

su per vene iin po lite 

in ter vene dis u nite 

nn fore seen re u nite ; 
GRAND MA. 

1. Have rou a grand ma? If so, how oil is 

she 1 

J5fe Yes, T -have a grand ina. She is a bout Pif ty 
ye?rs old. All her teeth are gone and she has to 
eat soft food. ' » ' 



FIRST DIXIE XKADBR. 55 

3. Bo yea not love, to sit by her, and eat her 
eras' - .? She is glad to have some one to eat crust, 
for when she sees it lie by, she fears some one will 
think it a large heap. 

4. My grand ma tells me pret ty sto ries. How 
I love to hear her talk of thip.gs which took place 
when she was a girl V 

5. But of all the sto ries, I love most to hear 
her talk of Jesus. She talks so sweet ly of heav- 
en, and how Jesus loved lit tie chil dren ? 

6 Bo you think all grand mas are good and 
gentle like ours ? I have seen some wick ed wo- 
men who I do not think were good grand rrias. 

-7. Quite like ly, for a bad wo man can not be a. 
good grand ma, be cause she does net know how 
Gocl is good to give us such grand mas. 



LISSON XXXIX. 



Lo tioa na tion lee tion 

mo tioa ra tion , die tion 

po'tion ' *ta tion fie tion 

no tion ac Liya unc tioa' 

por tion . fac tion func tion 

tor tion frac tion June tioa 



£6 • rcasT i>ixm rkadea, 



THE DEAD, BABY. 

' 1. See that sad mother ! Her lit tie babe Is 
dead, It is Dot stisnge &he looks Fad, 

2. It died of group. It was well two days 
a go, and could play as you do ; but now see its 
pale white face, 

3. Take its lit tie white &and in* yours and fee) 
Low en}d it is. Yea ask what made the fca by 
die. I will tell you. 

4. God saw it would le best to take it to hear- 
oa now. Per haps be look ed away in the fu> 
tuie, and saw that tbe child would not be good if 
it grew to be a man. 

5. O may be tbe fatb er and moth er. for got to 
love God, and be took their ba hy to make them 
want to go to heaven too. 

ii. Now a man takes the lit tie eof fin, and all 
tbe peo pic march si lent ly to the grave yard. 

7. There in a def p ho!<\ call ed a grave, they 
put down, the dead bod y, and cov er it up. Now 
tbe pa- rents can see it no more. 

8. Its lit tie bod y mmt turn to dust, but its 

soul has gone to meet its Sa vicr. 

»■ 

9. When Je sus was on the earth, he took lit- 
tle ebil dren in bis arms and bless ed thexa and 



FttST DIXIE RSADEB. 57 

said " Suffer lit tie cbil dren to come uq to me' 
and for bid them not." 



LESSON XL. 

Sep tern ber in bab it 

no vem ber co hab it 

de cem ber p~o bib it 

en cum ber dis cred it 

re mem ber de erep it 

. dis mem ber in her it 

A GOOD DOG. •' 

1. There was a man who had a good watch 
dog. His name was Doctor. 

2. When a ny thing was put out to sun, 
he lay by it, and not a cat or chick en durst 
touch it. 

3. When the war came on and the to ries 
be gan to prowl a bout of nights, Doc tor 
would not al low them to eome near his mas- 
ter's house^ 

4. This con duct of his made them ver y 



58 FIRST DIXIE READER. 

an gry at him, so the ? shot at him sev er al 

times, and came near kill ing him, 

* ■ 

5. One niglft they sent him howl ing back 
un der the house, and the fam ily thought 
he must die. 

6. With -tears in their eyes the daugh tors 
spoke of his loss, for both their broth ers 
were gone to the ar my, and the- dog and 
their aged fath er, were their only pro tec- 
tion. 

7. Thay said'" if Doc tor dies, we will trust in 
God." J5ut the dog got well, and still lives to 
guard his mas ter's bouse, and to be ca rested by 
all the fam i ly. 





LISSON XLT. 




Mis. give 


some thing 


dar ling 


cap tive 


stock ing • 

* 


star ling 


fes tive 


mid Sling 


ster ling 


eos tive 


eprink ling 


gos ling 


res the 


twink ling 


fat ling 


mo tive 


. s|p ling 


tact ling 



FIRST PIXIE READER. 59 



TEE SELFISH BOY. 



1. Fred Hamper went to cur school, and was 
known by the name of sel fish Fred. 

2. When at school Le al ways wanted the sect 
next the fire, if the day was cold, or next the win- 
dow if (Le heat was ep prcts ive. . 

3. No mat ter who else suff ered, Fred would 
have his place ; and in play he was the same way 
When he was at Borne, and the ctril dren had 
fruit or a a y nice thiDg, he would grw. 

4. So ycu see Fied soSn get tbc name of 
" sel fish Fred." Well, when he be came a maja he 
still took care of self. 

5. When at tea table, he would help him self 
large ly of the beet dish, 'and leave raaa y bits up> 
on bis plate. , , 

6. Pco pie soon found out that he was not a 
fair deal er, and they would have noth icg to do 
with him. 

7. He mar vied a good wife, but he was so mean 
and sel fish that she was not hap py. He mu3t 
.have his wants sup plied, no mat ter bow tired h\3 
wife was. She soon died of neglect; bat Fre 1 
vet lives. ' \ 



60 FIRST DIXIE READER. 

w 

LESSON XLTI. 
GOD IS IN HEAVEN. 

God is in heaven ; and can bear 

A feeble pmysr like mine ? 
Yes, little child, thou needcst not fear, 

He listens now to thine. 
God is in heaven ; and can he see 

When I am doing wrong ? 
Yes, child, he can — he looks at thee 

All day, and all night long. 
God in heaven and would he know 

If I fchould tell a lie ? 
Y*s, if thou saids't it e'er so low, 

He'd kear it in the sky. 
God is in heaven; and can I go 

•To thank him for his care ? 
Not yet — but love him here below, 
• And thou shalt praise him there,. 



FIRST DIXIE READER . 01 



LAST LESSON. 



1. N ■" .■/.•"! -drtn, we have goner thro' 
toother look*. I hope you have tried to 
learn it weJL 

2. I have tried to teach you some- thing 
use-ful, as well as how to . spell and read.-- 
Is is ver-y im-por-tant to learn to improve 
wha-t we read. 

3. Some peo-ple read a great deal, and 
yet you would nev er find it out un less they 
told yon. They do not read with care, and 
then they do not prac tice what they read. 

* *• 

4. But yon see oth-er3 w^o have gone to 
school but little, and have not had as much 
time for read-ing as some oth ers ; still they 
are much wiser. They read with care. 

5 This much for these lit-tle boys, and girls 
who have kind friends to send them to' school — 
But what shall we say to those poor -It-tlo chil- 
dren whose pa-rents are too poor to help 
get an ed u ca-tion ? Poor-children ! 

6. You must look to the Lord to raise you up 
friends. I have known poor chikdrea pray to 
J&od to pelp then get an edu-ca c tion. 



vi FKtST D1ZLB BXAJJBR. 

7. An 1 soon soaae kind por-son would lake 
them aad scud them to school* Ic the See-osd 
Rai-der I mast till , of sev-or-al boys and girls 
who thu.3 pray-ed, and who made u3e lal men and 
women. 

8.* I hope now if any of jovlj lack auy thing, 
you will know where to go to find it. Aod by all 
meao^ you must ask God to give you a mew heart. 

Aiieu, at present. ♦. 




I'M NOT TOO YOUNG FOR GOD TO SEE. 

" I'm not too young for God to see, 
He knows my name and nature too ; 

JLad all day long he looks at ine, 

And sees my actions through and tiro/ 

Ho listens to the words I say, 

And knows the thoughts I have within, 
x\nd whether I am at work or play 

He's sure to know it if I sin. 

0,' how could children tell a lie, 
Or cheat in play, or steal or figbt, 

If <hey remembered God wa* nigb, 
And had them always in his sight. 

Th*n when I want to do amiss, 

ilowover plsasnnt.it m3y be, 
I'll always strive to think Gf this — ■ 

I'm not too young for God to see." 



ii' A '1. 



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